Welcome to ‘Bikes For Sale’

Not your average West Australian bike shop

THE Bike Shed Times has launched its very own bike shop — and it’s not like any other in the world.

Bikes For Sale is a virtual shop, but with real bikes. They’re all for sale right now, and they’re all in Western Australia. The stock is hand-picked by The Bike Shed Times editor Peter Terlick who confesses he’s always wanted to own a bike shop with only “special” bikes on the showroom floor.

“The sad reality of running a ‘real’ bike shop is that you need volume,” Peter said.

“You need lots of bikes and you need to sell them quickly to make a quid. And to do that, you’ve got to fill your shop with big sellers. You know what I mean, Hyosungs and CBR500s and boring little LAMS-approved things that sell like hot cakes. But where’s the fun in that? I’d rather fill my shop with old Ducatis and modern Triumphs, or CB1100Rs, or immaculate Hyabusas, or two-stroke triple Suzukis, or BSA motocrossers. I’d like a shop full of funky old bikes and breath-taking modern bikes and historically significant dirt bikes and cleverly-executed custom bikes — the sorts of bikes that seem to be impossible to find when you go looking for them, and impossible to sell when you’re trying to get rid of them. They’re my kind of bikes. This is my kind of bike shop.”

The other upside of a virtual shop, of course, is that you don’t actually have to buy the bikes.

“I don’t own any of these bikes, but if I won Lotto tonight and found there was $300,000 left over after I paid off all my debts, I would buy the 24 bikes you see in Bikes For Sale right now.

“You’ll see, for example, a BSA B50MX. I’ve always wanted one. They pretty much marked the end of BSA’s dirt bike era and were the launch pad for Alan Clews. Alan bought a warehouse full of BSA bikes and parts and started building his own bikes that we know as CCMs, based on the B50MX. Wonderful stuff.  And there’s a fully restored 1969 Triumph Bonneville. I’ve always wanted one. The early Bonnies weren’t Americanised or stylised like the later ones. Function was their form. Simple and beautiful. And there’s a 1992 Honda Fireblade. I’ve always wanted one. They were the first Fireblade and set the standard for all superbikes ever since. There’s a 1966 Honda Dream 305. I’ve always wanted one. It’s the bike that Robert Pirsig rode in his book, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. I found one for sale in Perth. And now it’s in my shop. How cool is that?”

Peter says Bikes For Sale is designed to be a meeting place for West Australians who want to find special bikes and West Australians who want to sell special bikes.

“I didn’t know I wanted my 1988 Moto Guzzi LeMans 1000 until I stumbled across it one day, for sale,” he says. “As soon as I laid eyes on it, I had to have it. That’s the sort of serendipity I hope to create with Bikes For Sale.”

If you have a special bike you’d like The Bike Shed Times to put in Bikes For Sale, it’s going to cost you $12 for 8 weeks, assuming we agree with your assessment of its “specialness”.

But for now, please visit our shop. We think you’ll like it. You’ll find the tab at the top of our site, or you can use the short-cut link here.

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4 Comments on "Welcome to ‘Bikes For Sale’"

  1. Kevin johns | January 25, 2017 at 8:23 pm |

    Is a sweet 1977 R100S on your dream list? Which, after owning for 18 years, comes the time to move her on for someone else to enjoy.

    • Peter Terlick | January 25, 2017 at 9:57 pm |

      A great bike, Kevin — I remember them fondly! I recall reading an article recently suggesting the RS (very closely related to the S, as you know) was the greatest bike ever made.

  2. Is a 2005 Moto Guzzi Breva V1100 a ‘special’?
    I’ve got one I will need to sell.

    • Peter Terlick | December 6, 2016 at 5:54 pm |

      Mil, your Breva was the first of the new breed of big-bore tourers from Guzzi after the Aprilia takeover back in 2000. Guzzi tested the waters with the 750 Breva, but the 1100 was the end-game, and it was released in 2005. That means your bike ticks the ‘historically significant’ box for us!

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